Disability Pride Flag: everything you need to know

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Image of the new disability pride flag. A dark grey background with five diagonal stripes in this order: red, yellow, white, blue, green (from the bottom up).

Disability Pride Flag Explained

Ann Magill, a disabled woman, published the original Disability Pride Flag in 2016.

The Disability Pride Flag is often flown and displayed during Disability Pride Month, which first took place in July 1990 to mark the passing of the Americans with Disability Act (ADA). This landmark legislation, which was signed by President George H.W. Bush on July 26, 1990,  prohibited discrimination against disabled people. In that same year, Boston held the first Disability Pride Day. Ever since then the disability pride flag has helped increase the disability community’s visibility.

Why was it created and what is the disability pride flag history?

In their own words, Ann Magill describes why and when was the disability pride flag created:


"As I'm growing older, the issue of Disability Rights has been deeply important to me.


Ever since I attended the local 'celebration' of the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 2010, only to find disappointment that the celebration was confined to the basement and grounds of the regional Independent Living Center instead of out in public, I've wanted a Disability Pride Flag.


Six years later, after the massacre at the Tsukui Yamayuri En care home in Sagamihara, Japan, when nineteen disabled inmates were murdered and twenty-six injured (because they were disabled, by the killer's own confession), I was driven to design an actual disability flag, instead of just wishing we had one."


Ann Magill, Designer of the Disability Pride Flag

On 4 June 2019, Ann Magill officially waived all copyright claims to the disability pride flag and generously registered it under International Public Domain. This allowed the disability pride flag to be shared and adapted, even for commercial purposes.

The disability pride flag redesign explained

Early in July 2021, Ann learned that, even with desaturated colors, the "Lightening Bolt" zigzag design in their original Disability Pride Flag could create a strobe effect. And this effect posed a risk for people with epilepsy and migraine sufferers.


Ann then collaborated with several people in the Disability community on Tumblr to reach a consensus on a new design for the Disability Pride Flag that wouldn't a pose risk. 


You can read an energetic conversation on Reddit about the new Disability Pride Flag design, which demonstrates Ann Magill collaborated with the online disability community to create a Disability Pride Flag that represents disabled people. 

"I think of this Disability Pride Flag as signifying our solidarity with each other as individuals, spanning/regardless of borders between us, and fighting for our rights on a grassroots level"

Ann Magill

"Along with simplifying the central motif to straight lines, the colors have been rearranged so that the warm colors (red and gold) and cool colors (blue and green) are grouped together. 


And the brightness of the colors on the disability pride flag has also been edited so that they radiate more evenly from brightest at the center toward darker in the outside stripes."


"I think of this Disability Pride Flag as signifying our solidarity with each other as individuals, spanning/regardless of borders between us, and fighting for our rights on a grassroots level." 


To read Ann Magill's original Disability Pride Flag design statement, visit her blog: Notes, Notings, and Common Refrains  The songs that are stuck in my head!


[We have chosen not to display the old disability pride flag due to the strobe effect and Ann's request to focus on one version of the flag]

"I believe it is better for communication and (disability) awareness that we focus on one version of the disability pride flag"

Ann Magill

Feel free to download the new Disability Pride Flag by Ann Magill.

The Disability Pride Flag is distributed under a Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication.


Disability Pride Flag Download

(just right-click on it and select “Save image” from the menu)

Image of the new disability pride flag. A dark grey background with five diagonal stripes in this order: red, yellow, white, blue, green (from the bottom up).
New Disability Pride Flag - ​​Ann Magill CC BY-SA 4.0



What is the Disability Pride Flag meaning

What does the disability pride flag mean? Each of the old and new Disability Pride Flag elements has a particular meaning:


The Black Field on the disability pride flag is a color of mourning. This represents disabled people who have suffered from "Ableist violence, rebellion, and protest." It represents disabled people who have lost their life not only to their illness but also to suicide, negligence and eugenics.


The Five Colors on the disability pride flag -  red, gold, pale grey, blue, and green - represent the various needs and experiences of disabled people: mental illness, intellectual and developmental disability, invisible and undiagnosed disabilities, physical disability, and sensory Disabilities.


The Parallel Diagonal Stripes of the Disability Pride Flag represent solidarity within the Disability Community and all its differences. The diagonal suggests cutting across barriers that separate the disabled from society.



What are the color codes for the disability pride flag?

The hex (hexadecimal) and RGB color codes for the new Disability Pride Flag are:

  • Black Field: Mourning for ableist violence and abuse victims. Hexadecimal and RGB: #585858 RGB (80, 80, 80)
  • Red Stripe: Physical Disabilities. Hexadecimal and RGB color: #CF7280 RGB (207, 114, 123)
  • Gold Stripe: Neurodivergence. Hexadecimal and RGB color: #EEDF77 RGB (238, 223, 119)
  • White Stripe: Invisible and undiagnosed disabilities. Hexadecimal and RGB color: #E9E9E9 RGB (233, 233, 233)
  • Blue Stripe: Psychiatric disabilities. Hexadecimal and RGB color: #7AC1E0 RGB (122, 193, 224)
  • Green Stripe: Sensory perception disabilities. Hexadecimal and RGB color: #3AAF7D RGB (58, 175, 125)

The Disability Pride Colors posted here were designed by Ann Magill for online/illuminated screen use, so the black is deliberately lightened (it's not meant to be dark, if used online).



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